News & Announcements

Headlines

Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences in the news
September 8, 2017
  • Trash on beach

Those foam food to-go containers? Soon to be gone. A polystyrene food container ban took a big leap forward in Hilo, Hawaii.

August 31, 2017
  • Social spiders

The social spiders studied by Jonthan Pruitt of UC Santa Barbara make considerable sacrifices for their offspring. They have a remarkable suicidal co-operative care system, where adults liquefy their own bodies to feed the groups’ young. However it was not their breeding that Pruitt discussed, but rather the differing personalities of individuals within the spider groups.

August 30, 2017
  • Gold nanoparticles

To increase the accuracy of medical screening and reduce the incidence of false positives, UCSB chemistry and biochemistry professors designed a biomedical assay that eliminates the readout of these faulty results.

August 29, 2017

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

 

Now, three scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The trio, including Julie Jastrow of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, published their ideas in the August issue of Nature Microbiology.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

 

Now, three scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The trio, including Julie Jastrow of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, published their ideas in the August issue of Nature Microbiology.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

 

Now, three scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The trio, including Julie Jastrow of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, published their ideas in the August issue of Nature Microbiology.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

 

Now, three scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The trio, including Julie Jastrow of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, published their ideas in the August issue of Nature Microbiology.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-outsized-role-soil-microbes.html#jCp

Many complexities of the carbon sequestration process remain poorly understood, despite years of research and the significant impact of this process on global climate.

Now, three scientists have proposed a new approach to better understand the role of soil organic matter in long-term carbon storage and its response to changes in global climate and atmospheric chemistry. The trio, including Julie Jastrow of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, published their ideas in the August issue of Nature Microbiology.

Announcements

Divisional announcements and opportunities

Funded through an annual gift of up to $75,000 from the Errett Fisher Foundation, the Daryl and Marguerite Errett Discovery Award in Biomedical Research is intended to honor the lives of Daryl and Marguerite Errett, while providing seed funding to the most exceptional young postdocs or research professionals (non-tenured faculty) at UC Santa Barbara early in their careers to support their innovative research in the field of biomedicine.

All faculty members in the Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences (MLPS) and the College of Engineering are invited to nominate a postdoctoral fellow for this prestigious award that provides seed funding to support his/her innovative, cutting-edge research, that might be considered too risky by agencies such as NIH.

Long-time member and supporter of the UCSB Foundation, Kenny Slaught has recently noted on his blog at KennySlaught.com that “The University of California Santa Barbara announced on May 26, 2016 that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations grant winner.”

David Low, a professor in UCSB’s Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project titled “Strategy for development of enteric pathogen-specific phage”. Low’s research focuses on a new way to deal with serious bacterial pathogens that are becoming resistant to many once-powerful antibiotics. According to Kenny Slaught, “He will engineer phage to selectively target and destroy several pathogenic bacteria to prevent enteric diseases in infants”.

Funded through a generous $47,000 gift from international business leader and entrepreneur Harvey Karp, the Harvey L. Karp Discovery Award is intended to provide seed funding to the most exceptional young postdocs at UC Santa Barbara early in their careers and support their innovative research. Applications due: May 12, 2017